Tags

, , , , , , , ,

Steampunk Dining Area

Steampunk Dining Area

Steampunk Wall Art

Steampunk Wall Art

Steampunk Foyer

Steampunk Foyer

Steampunk Office

Steampunk Office

You may have heard the term Steampunk, or maybe not. It describes a style which is used for home décor as well as fashion. I am more interested in the décor aspects.

I appreciate unique and distinct ideas and since one of the elements of this style incorporates Victorian touches, I felt it is worthy of mention. Being naturally inquisitive I was curious to know “what is Steampunk décor?”. I have heard the term Steampunk more frequently, and having viewed a few examples, some featured on house/decorating shows such as; “You Live In What?”, “Home Strange Home” and “Extreme Home”, I wondered … is this a new upcoming trend, is it a subculture or a cult? Whether it is a movement or not, I think pieces from this eclectic style could easily be incorporated in a Victorian Home, or a Century Loft Conversion, (have a look at the Steampunk Wall Art photo!).

After some research … I am still not 100% sure what it is, but I know that Steampunk combines elements of neo-Victorian style (an amalgamation of Victorian and Edwardian principles), retro-futuristic components and science fiction. I find it very interesting from a design perspective… (not so sure about the fashion component).

The name Steampunk is inspired from an era when steam was a primary source of power. Part history and part imagination, it creates a futuristic ‘past that never was’. I suppose it could be referred to as ‘alternative decorating’.

Popular materials used in Steampunk are natural; such as copper, iron, wood, cork, glass leather, gears and lace, all combined in one style. There are no strict rules but there are a few basic elements.

Old technology is integrated in this style, using parts and pieces of gears, exposed copper plumbing, clock and watch parts, chains, and vintage machinery.

Essential to Steampunk are Victorian Era touches such as lace, vintage vases, and nature collections and anatomical diagrams which were a common trend during the Victorian times.

The science fiction element would include components such digital mechanical computers, analog computers, more current items such as touchtone phones.

Colours used in Steampunk are quite similar to Victorian days; harsh or bright colours are not used. Burnt orange, Mustard yellow, Deep reds, Gray, Black, Cream, Burgundy, Warm browns and sepia tones, and brass, silver, gold, copper and other metallic shades are widely used in this theme.

Is this an upcoming trend in interior design?…not sure. I certainly can see elements blending nicely in a century home. I have not seen Steampunk emerging in to the decor inspired chain stores , but if you look closely you will see a few “steampunk” influenced pieces here and there. Inspired?…do check antique shops, salavage outlets as well as The Timeless Materials Co. in Waterloo http://www.timelessmaterials.com/. Interestingly enough….check Ebay…..search Steampunk….many sources are available.

Advertisements